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"Doubts that are coming to the way of your growth."

"Doubts that are coming into the way of your growth."

What should be more appropriate choice "to" or "into" here? And both of them are grammatical?

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    By themselves its hard to get what you are meaning. Could you give some more explanation? My guess on the intended meaning would be something like "Doubts that you get regarding the way you grow up."
    – user3169
    May 11, 2014 at 21:43

2 Answers 2

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Neither. I would say "Doubts that are getting in the way of your growth" assuming that's what you mean (preventing/not allowing growth).

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    I agree, but idiomatically I feel getting in the way of isn't the best term to use here in the first place. I'd much prefer "Doubts that are hindering your growth". There are dozen of instances of "that are hindering your growth" in Google Books, but none at all for the same construction using getting in the way of. May 11, 2014 at 22:22
  • Yes, hindering is much better.
    – user8674
    May 11, 2014 at 23:02
  • Great. I just want to know if "coming to the way" and "getting in the way" both means the same? both could alternate each other?
    – arm
    May 12, 2014 at 11:41
  • "Coming to the way" is very unnatural and at first I didn't understand what you meant by it (or your other example). Definitely don't alternate them. You could alternate "hindering" with "getting in the way" if you want to alternate, because while "hindering" is better and more natural "getting in the way" is still acceptable/comprehensible.
    – user8674
    May 12, 2014 at 12:28
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Sentences can be right depending on the context.


"Doubts that are coming to the way of your growth."

This implies that doubts are somehow coming because of your growth.

Consider this context:

Master: "Did you see how I beat you? Your mind was full of doubt. In order for you to be come a true ninja master, you must clear your mind of all doubts. Only then will you grow."

Student: "I have cleared my mind."

Master: "No. You still have doubts. Doubts that you have created in your mind. Doubts that are coming to the way of your growth, hampering it, stalling it."


"Doubts that are coming into the way of your growth."

Implies that doubts are what's halting your growth.

Consider this context:

Master: "Did you see how I beat you? Your mind was full of doubt. In order for you to be come a true ninja master, you must clear your mind of all doubts. Only then will you grow."

Student: "I have cleared my mind."

Master: "No. You still have doubts. Doubts that are coming into the way of your growth. You will never become a ninja master."


Thought both can be considered correct, they are clumsy.

Consider alternatives.

  • "Doubts that are coming in the way of your growth."
  • "Doubts that obstruct your growth."
  • "Doubts that are in the way of your growth."
  • "Doubts that hamper your growth."
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    Nah. "Doubts that are coming to the way of your growth" doesn't imply that doubts are somehow coming because of your growth. It simply implies that the source is not a native speaker. May 11, 2014 at 23:06
  • @FumbleFingers Well, it made sense to me, but I suppose you're right. Reading all these old novels and their strange use of the English language seems to have corrupted my sense of appropriate/correct discourse.
    – Tucker
    May 12, 2014 at 7:04
  • I know what you mean. Pre-Internet, probably the majority of "weird" constructions I'd come across would actually be archaic forms once used by native speakers (or "regionalisms", obviously). Today it's mostly just bad translations from non-native speakers (especially for me on ELL and ELU! :) May 12, 2014 at 12:14
  • @FumbleFingers Am actually reading some of H. G. Wells' old editions (before they were updated). Apart from the blatant racism, it really does have some sentences that feel badly constructed and wrong.
    – Tucker
    May 12, 2014 at 12:30
  • But Wells himself is famous for being anti racist in an age where such a position was completely alien to the social norms of the time. Google his oft-repeated "I am convinced myself that there is no more evil thing in this present world than race prejudice", and bear that in mind when you're reading his work. May 12, 2014 at 13:48

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