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Feasts, by means of structure and ritual, deliberately use the powerful connotations of food to recall origins and earlier times. They also attempt to be events in themselves unforgettable, in order to furnish recollections for the future. The food served at festivals is, therefore, not only richer and more splendid than what we usually eat, but also traditional, inherited from the past and intended to be experienced as ancient custom.

In this writing, about this sentence, "The food served at festivals is, therefore, not only richer and more splendid than what we usually eat, but also traditional, inherited from the past and intended to be experienced as ancient custom", I just got an answer from an English expert who is a native English speaker that the past partipical phrase, "inherited from the past....ancient custom" is used to express "traditional", but you know "traditional" is an adjective, but not a noun, so how come the past participial phrase is used to express the adjective?

Is it possible to regard an adjective as a noun when we express the meaning of the adjective like in the sentence?

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