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For example, someone asks someone about something that was done wrong and someone answers that all the questions are not for him, since he does not know this and it was a fault of the answerer.

Or if someone asks you about something for example about construction safety and you want to direct him to another person about this one.

Is this correct? I also have questions about on and for. What is the difference?

On all questions (not) to him. On all safety questions to John.

For all questions (not) to him. For all safety questions to John.

  • Could you explain the situation more? It's hard to understand the meaning you want right now with what you have written. – BadZen Dec 18 '19 at 22:27
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I think you'd likely hear this kind of thing:

For all safety questions, please go to John.

For all safety-related questions, please go to John.

For all questions on safety, please go to John.

I'm struggling to make sense of the first part of your question. For that specific context, the person who was questioned might just answer something like:

I don't know anything about that; you'll have to ask someone else.

Or perhaps:

This isn't my area [of expertise]; you'll have to ask someone else.

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