1

(My car is at the garage.It is being repaired,somebody is repairing it ) I think it should be in instead of at because my car is present in the building/shed and it is not out present of building/shed

1

The difference between the alternative forms is chiefly idiomatic. English speakers would always prefer “at the garage” to refer to the car being repaired at a workshop and would generally prefer “in the garage” to refer to your car being housed at your own premises.

3
  • 1
    This is not right. in the garage can two things : repair or where the car is (not on the street, parked in a garage). And it is not true that English speakers prefer one over the other.
    – Lambie
    Dec 17 '19 at 22:46
  • This analysis is incorrect. It makes no difference at all if you think of garage as referring to a mechanic's shop or a part of a house Dec 22 '19 at 13:53
  • 1
    Wow, I’m surprised by these comments. You only have to think of a suitable context to realise “at the garage” does not naturally refer to a car housed in the home garage. For example: talking to my 20yo daughter about her car when we arrive at our shared home and notice no car on the street, I say, “where’s your car?” She will say, “IN the garage” (never “AT the garage”) to refer to the fact that it’s parked inside our nearby shed. Dec 22 '19 at 22:21
1
  • My car is at the garage. [yes, being repaired]
  • My car is in the garage. [also being repaired]

but in the garage can also mean: it is in the garage and not on the street/outside.

[outside something]

3
  • @ManishkumarKumar Please, please do not repeat the question. [why do we use, not why will be use. I have answered the question.
    – Lambie
    Dec 15 '19 at 19:17
  • @ManishkumarKumar, you car may be in the garage (building), but also at the garage (business which engages in automobile maintenance and repair). Dec 15 '19 at 19:51
  • @ManishkumarKumar Because both at the garage and inside the garage refer to the same location of the car. It's just that there is a subtle difference between the two. Dec 22 '19 at 13:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.