0

The company will put in place some policies to cut cost. Nevertheless, not all the policies that will be put in place will be favorable by everyone.

Is the sentence above with two "will be" in one sentence grammatically correct? Does it read awkwardly?

  • 2
    Nothing wrong with two futurate forms in one sentence. The idiom is "to cut costs" plural. Favorable licenses the preposition to, not by. And it's a bit wordy. How about, "To cut costs the company must put in place policies that will not be favorable to some employees." – user105719 Dec 17 '19 at 6:32
  • 1
    Your sentence might not be ungrammatical, but it is a bit wordy/clunky. You want to get across the information as smoothly as possible. You already have "will put in place" in the first sentence. It is not needed in the second. I think user105719 has given you good feedback. You can reword it if you want (because to me, it sounds awkward). "The company will implement policies to cut costs. However, not all of them will be ..." – AIQ Dec 17 '19 at 7:56
1

Nevertheless, not all the policies that will be put in place will be favorable by everyone.

I see nothing wrong with the sentence.

        noun phrase acting as the subject       verb
{--------------------------------------------} {-----}
not all the policies that will be put in place will be favorable by everyone.
{                  } {-----------------------}
{------------------}       relative clause
   ^                                   |
   |___adds specific details to this___|

"All the policies that will be put in place" is a noun phrase. In that noun phrase, "that will be put in place" is a relative clause that adds information to or specify details about "all the policies". With that said, "all the policies that will be put in place" can be treated as the usual subject in the sentence. "Not" is just there to negate the "all" in "all the policies".

The 2 will be's are used differently here and don't directly affect each other. There's no problem with the grammar.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.