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It sounds like the lecturer is saying

the more attributes the more variables you have to start with, the larger the space at your searching of solutions.

I understood the lecturer is trying to say something like the algorithm needs to search a larger space.

I would like to know if those words all are in an appropriate order.

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As a native English speaker I can't parse that sentence fragment, as I'm looking for a time or a location after the "at". If the phrase were

"The larger the space in which you search for solutions, [the slower the algorithm runs]"

then yes the words are in the appropriate order. The construction "The larger/more x, then y" is fairly common to help people remember things but is somewhat awkward. One could rewrite the phrase as.

"The algorithm runs more slowly as the size of the space searched increases."

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They words are in an appropriate order, but a word is missing from the first part, and a different series of words would be more appropriate in the second part.

The following is a possible restatement that has the sentence make more sense:

The more attributes and the more variables you have to start with, the larger the space you have at your when searching of for solutions.

→ ✔ The more attributes and the more variables you have to start with, the larger the space you have when searching for solutions.


In particular, this phrase in the original is ungrammatical, which is why it needs to be rephrased:

✘ the space at your searching of
✔ the space you have when searching for

However, once replaced with better wording, the actual sequence of the sentence is fine.

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I don't quite agree with YouTube's captions. I hear this:

So one take-home message here is that the more features, the more co-variance, the more attributes, the more variables you have to start with, the larger the space that you're searching of solutions.

I find "that you're" easier to parse here than the "at your" in the caption.

There is a pause just before the phrase "of solutions". It seems reasonable to interpret that pause as signaling an after-thought, a late realization that he wanted to specify which space. Over the course of the lecture, he refers to several different spaces, including input space and concept space, as well as solution space.

If we assume that "of solutions" is an after-thought, we can paraphrase his statement with the phrase in question placed more naturally:

So one take-home message here is that the more features, the more co-variance, the more attributes, the more variables you have to start with, the larger the space of solutions that you're searching.

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