0

Epilepsy is considered to be disease of the brain defined by any of the following conditions: 1) at least two unprovoked (or reflex) seizures occurring >24 h apart;"

Does it mean that the seizures should be in two different days (in more than 24 hours)? I'm a little bit confused with this phrase.

2
  • That is correct, the greater-than sign > is shorthand for the words greater than or more than here. "More than 24 hours apart" means there are at least 24 hours between the events.
    – BadZen
    Dec 18, 2019 at 15:02
  • Right, I edited this typo. Dec 18, 2019 at 16:34

1 Answer 1

1

The sign > means "greater than" or "more than" in mathematical notation. So the phrase refers to "seizures occurring more than 24 hours apart".

The meaning of that is the straightforward one. If the second seizure occurs later than 24 hours after the first, then they are more than 24 hours apart. For all seizures to be more than 24 hours apart, no seizure must be less than 24 hours after the previous one. It does not matter if they are on the same day or not.

5
  • I didn't understand all the following phrase: "For all seizures to be more than 24 hours apart, no seizure must be less than 24 hours after the previous one. It does not matter if they are on the same day or not." Dec 18, 2019 at 16:35
  • If the first seizure occurs at 11pm, and the next at 7am the next day, then they are less than 24 hours apart, even though they are on different days. Dec 18, 2019 at 17:17
  • Then I think the word 'no' should be 'one', otherwise it dorsn't make sense. "For all seizures to be more than 24 hours apart, no seizure must be less than 24 hours after the previous one. It does not matter if they are on the same day or not". Dec 18, 2019 at 20:05
  • Changing "no" to "one" would make it the opposite of what I meant. "no seizure must be less than 24 hours after the previous one" means "there is not any seizure that is less that 24 hours after the one before it." Dec 18, 2019 at 20:07
  • My bad. I got you. Dec 18, 2019 at 21:07

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .