1

I googled myself a little to see which article is more commonly used with types, and I understood one commonly uses a to indicate a general type such as integer.

But what about a specific type such as a structure? For example, which one should I use when I'm writing a sentence like below?

A: Assume a delegate pointer is a T type.

B: Assume a delegate pointer is the T type.

I used T to denote the name of a specific data type. Both look somewhat awkward for me, since A is like it's indicating one of many T types (which is not), and B looks a little redundant due to the.

Some might suggest I can simply write

Assume a delegate pointer is T,

but I'd rather make it clear that the T I'm using is a kind of type.

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What I'd say is

Assume a delegate pointer is of type T.

In casual conversation, I might say any of the following:

Assume a delegate pointer is a T.

Assume a delegate pointer has a type of T. (best)

Assume a delegate pointer has the type T.

Assume a delegate pointer has type T.

but these all sound less CS-like.

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  • Thanks a lot! I also wondered if I can say 'type T' without an article. :] Dec 19 '19 at 5:13

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