1

Is natural and common to use "will" for official arrangements and scheduled events? For example:

The meeting will start at 9 o'clock.

My vacation will start on December 21st.

The bus will leave at 8 o'clock.

Would the meaning of the sentences change somehow if will be replaced with the simple present? For example:

The meeting starts at 9 o'clock.

My vacation starts on December 21st.

The bus leaves at 8 o'clock.

If the meaning of the sentences don't change at all, then which is more common?

  • 1
    will is indeed formal there. – Lambie Dec 21 '19 at 18:40
0

It is natural and common to use "will" in these situations.

Using simple present adds a nuance of inevitability.

The meeting starts at 9:00 (Even if you are not there, so don't be late, we won't wait for you!)

The "will" form is probably more common (though I don't have any data to hand)

You don't tend to use the simple present for future events that you can control. This is related to the other sense of "will"=determination or desire.

I'll wake you up at 7 am tomorrow

(?) I wake you up at 7 am tomorrow

  • James K, the present continuous works for this, right? "I am waking you up at 7 am tomorrow." – AIQ Dec 22 '19 at 0:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.