1

A bottle which was produced by my company, of water.

Is the word order of this sentence correct? The bottle was produced by my company but I wonder if this sentence can be understood easily when I use "of water" end of the sentence.

1

That phrase include a non-restrictive clause, so it should be written

A bottle of water, which was produced by my company, ...

A native speaker would interpret that as meaning your company, which produces bottled water, produced that specific bottle of water. The actual bottle (and the actual water) might have been made by some other party.

If you work for a company that manufactures empty bottles and sells them to a bottled-water company, you would have to say that in detail:

A bottle of water, the actual bottle for which was produced by my company, ...

| improve this answer | |
  • Is it ok to say A bottle of water, where the bottle was produced by my company? – dan Dec 24 '19 at 23:49
  • @dan, where in this context is a casual way of "in the case that". So you could say, "It's OK to keep on my desk at work a bottle of water, where the bottle was produced by my company" — although if or as long as would be more idiomatic. But if you are talking about a specific bottle, "On my desk was..." it just seems weird. – Malvolio Dec 25 '19 at 2:31
0

First, this is not a complete sentence: there is no main verb. The fragment consists of a noun followed by a relative clause. Together they form a subject clause.

The word order of the fragment is not correct. "... of water" belongs to the noun and should go before the relative clause:

The bottle of water which was produced by my company ...

| improve this answer | |
  • Okay. But ıt confuses me I couldn’t understand whether bottle or water produced by my company . But I know that bottle was produced by my company. – Foreign student Dec 24 '19 at 21:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.