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Is there any difference in meaning?

Are Possessive ’s and of interchangeable?

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    One particular case deserves noting. "A picture of John" is a portrayal of John, while "John's picture" may refer to a picture that John owns. – user105719 Dec 27 '19 at 6:35
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This follows the usual pattern with titles like "Lord", "Duke" or "King". We tend to say:

Duke of York

King of England

and metaphorically

Queen of Hearts

Prince of Thieves

So as a title, the usual structure uses "of", and the possessive "'s" is not equivalent.

It is possible to say "England's king", but as a description and not a title.

Frodo is not the rings' lord or master and never will be. The Lord of the Rings is Sauron.

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For inanimates (e.g. the Rings), the form "of the" is preferred to "'s".

Stylistically, the fact that this form emphasizes the Lord rather than the Rings can also explain this choice.

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