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These 2 words have the same translation in my native language, and I don't get the difference in these contexts. For example, should I say:

Amanda leant her elbows on her thighs, leaning her hands on her head.

Amanda supported her elbows on her thighs, supporting her hands on her head.

(I want to say that she put her elbows on her thighs, and put her hands below her head)

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Some students don't lean their notebooks on their desk, and therefore they have a sloppy handwriting.

Some students don't support their notebooks on their desk, and therefore they have a sloppy handwriting.

(I want to say that they don't put their notebooks on their desk, so they don't have a good handwriting)

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    In English, the two words are often effectively opposites. So The ladder leans on / against the wall can be described from the opposite perspective as The wall supports the ladder. Does that help you see the difference? – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Dec 26 '19 at 18:01
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I generally agree with LawrenceC's answer, but there is a bit more to say.

Lean is one of many verbs in English which can be used as transitive or intransitive. The intransitive use refers to the object which is tilted (as LawrenceC says):

The ladder was leaning against the wall.

The transitive use is causitive:

I leaned the ladder against the wall.

Support is different: it is only transitive; and it is the surface or object which provides the support which is the subject:

The wall was supporting the ladder.

If you use it with a person as subject, this is still true: it is not a causitive.

So, while you can say

I supported the ladder against the wall.

this doesn't mean that I simply placed the ladder there, but that I went on holding it, making sure it didn't fall (presumably, while somebody was climbing it). I wasn't just causing it to support, but actually supporting it.

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X leans on Y or Z leans X on Y specifically means X tilts (or is made to tilt by Z) toward Y far enough to touch it. This usually means either X or Y is supported by the other.

If you replace the above with support, tilting might be involved but other methods of keeping X on Y could be used.

I leaned the board on the table (Board is tilted).

I supported the board on the table (Board might actually be on top of the table somehow with something else involved, like a small box, etc. - or you might be physically holding it there)

Now, for this:

Some students don't lean their notebooks on their desk, and therefore they have a sloppy handwriting.

Lean is generally a "vertical" thing. If the student's desks aren't very vertical (anything called a "desk" probably isn't), lean is the wrong word. You want to say lay flat on.

Some students don't lay their notebooks flat on their desk, and therefore they have a sloppy handwriting.

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