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Can I say "I have been living there since 2001 but I don't live there now."?

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    No; 'I have been living there since ...' demands you still be there. 'I was living there from 2001 (to 2012), but I don't live there now.' – Edwin Ashworth Dec 28 '19 at 17:54
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    Or "I had been living there" (past perfect). – Spencer Dec 28 '19 at 17:59
  • Thanks a lot___ – deneyoy Dec 28 '19 at 18:19
  • Note: "I had been living there until 2001" means you moved out of there in 2001. "I had been living there since 2001" means you moved in there in 2001. – jimm101 Dec 28 '19 at 18:39
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    You would simply say that you lived there from 2001 to 2009. No continuous at all.] – tchrist Dec 28 '19 at 18:41
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The first clause contradicts the second. The first implies that I am still living there. The second explicitly contradicts the first. So there is no grammar error, but there is an inconsistency. You need to use a past tense to express a past state.:

I was living there from 2001 to 2012...

I had been living there since 2001 ...

I lived there between 2001 and 2012...

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