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I wonder if a suggestion being given with hindsight can be expressed via "had better" used this way:

You'd better have/haven't followed his advice?

The other ways to put it which I'm thinking of are:

It would have been better if you'd/hadn't followed his advice

It would have been better for you to have/not to have followed his advice

Could each of the sentences work?

If yes, what might be the nuances of the usage I should bear in mind?

Are there other ways to express the same idea with a tint of reproach/regret/irritation to the actions already performed by someone else?

P.S. I do bear in mind that "You should/shouldn't have followed his advice" is obviously the safest choice. I just felt like digging a bit deeper, having stumbled on the question discussed but not solved on a couple of the English usage sites--to no avail so far, unfortunately.

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You'd better have/haven't followed his advice

No - those are ungrammatical.

It would have been better if you'd followed his advice
It would have been better if you hadn't followed his advice

Yes - those are both fine.
A slightly old-fashioned, but perhaps more elegant, way to put it would be:

It would have been better had you followed his advice
It would have been better had you not followed his advice

The following versions suggest that the consequences for you personally would have been better:

It would have been better for you to have followed his advice
It would have been better for you not to have followed his advice

You could add "a tint of reproach/regret/irritation" by using might instead of would.

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*You'd better have followed his advice?

*You'd better haven't followed his advice?

Neither of these is idiomatic or logical. "You'd better" is a warning, expressed in a hortative mood. You can't warn someone about something that's already happened. You can only warn someone about a future event that may or may not happen.

It would have been better if you'd followed his advice.

It would have been better if hadn't followed his advice.

It would have been better for you to have followed his advice.

It would have been better for you not to have followed his advice.

All of these are idiomatic and logical as are:

You should have followed his advice.

You shouldn't have followed his advice.

These are all examples of the irrealis mood, where the situation spoken about has not happened.

"It would have been better" is very mild. There's very little suggestion of blame. "You weren't to know. I'd have done the same in your place."

"You should [not] have" is stronger. "You should have known better. It's your fault things turned out the way they did. You've only got yourself to blame."

You can adjust your initial sentences as follows:

You'd have done better to have followed his advice.

You'd have done better not to have followed his advice.

You'd have done better to have not followed his advice.

However, these are nowhere near as strong as "You'd better", because there is an implied "or else!": "You'd better [not] [...], or else!"

You'd better go to the shops right now, or [else] you'll get no dinner tonight!

"You should [not] have" is the strongest way I can think of expressing disapproval of a past action. For expressing disapproval of a potential future action, "should [not]" is not that strong. "had better [not]" and "must [not]" are much stronger.

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