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I want to say that there two persons who came to do something and I highly respect them and I want to call them by name in the same sentence.
I thought it should be like this: "Deeply respected by me, Henry and Jack are well known, they came there to tell you something."
or
"Well known people Henry and Jack, deeply respected by me, came here to tell you something."

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    You mean, is it OK with no subject? In general, no. – GEdgar Dec 30 '19 at 21:50
  • @GEdgar thanks Edgar, may be you could show the most closet sentence structure to mine. – R S Dec 30 '19 at 22:15
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    You could say "Henry is deeply respected by me, Henry, and Jack". (Though putting "me" first is often frowned upon.) – Hot Licks Dec 30 '19 at 22:15
  • @Hot Licks The first - do you mean as in your example, before Henry and Jack? – R S Dec 30 '19 at 22:16
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    It's nearly always highly respected, not deeply. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Dec 31 '19 at 12:53
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For non-experts in English: You will get into less trouble if you put the subject of the sentence first.

These are clumsy:

Deeply respected by me, Henry and Jack are well known, they came there to tell you something.
Well known people Henry and Jack, deeply respected by me, came here to tell you something.

To make them clear, start with the subject:

Henry and Jack, who are well known and deeply respected by me, came here to tell you something.

Another way to write clearly would be to separate it into two sentences.

Henry and Jack came here to tell you something. They are well known, and I deeply respect them.

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