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Let's say I made your list. Does it mean I managed to get into your list or I created a list for you? Do we have to rely on context to determine which meaning is intended?

Is there any difference among make a list, make the list and make one's list?

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It is difficult to say anything without having more context. Adding more ambiguity is the use of 'your' and not 'you' (which makes the list personal).

Just like I made your clothes, I made your list may work where it means that you helped someone make his/her list. But as I said, more context will clarify it further. If you get into the list, I'd add a preposition - I made to your list. Nevertheless, a more-common expression I've come across is to say I managed to ...

As far as the second part of the question is concerned, it's very clear -

make a list - make any/random list
make the list - very specific (the listener and the speaker both know which list they are talking about) and,
make one's list - generalized, can refer to any person's list.

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  • Well, make the list is probably an idiom as in "The Eiffel Tower would have made their list".
    – dan
    Jan 1 '20 at 9:25
  • Native English speakers wouldn't say I made to your list; made needs an object, and to is the wrong preposition. They might say I got onto your list; I made it onto your list; or maybe even I made your list. Feb 3 '20 at 16:06

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