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I'm married with two kids

Is that expression written here correct? Or it should be with a comma?

I'm married, with two kids

If none of those are common, is it better to say...

I'am married and have two kids.

Does with mean a simple with there? If yes, is anything possible that you carry when you are married?

I'm married with a car
I'm married with a pet
I'm married with a pen

All because when I got married, I carried my favorite things - car, pet and pen with me?

1 Answer 1

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I'm married with two kids

is OK. No comma is needed.

As for:

I'm married with a car
I'm married with a pet
I'm married with a pen

with implies some relationship between married and these things. Though you have them due to being married, it still seems a bit strange. Here its better to say:

I'm married and have a car.
or
I'm married and now have a car.

now fixes the item time-wise to the married condition.

I'm married and have two kids.

is also OK.

3
  • comma not needed, but what if I put?
    – Maulik V
    May 14, 2014 at 5:43
  • The comma is not separating phrases, lists etc. as I would normally expect. I can't say the rule but possibly if you are trying to indicate a forced pause it may be OK
    – user3169
    May 14, 2014 at 5:48
  • I've heard people saying "I'm married with a [insert pet species]" as a jokey reference to "I'm married with n kids".
    – wizzwizz4
    Apr 24, 2018 at 20:59

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