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'Some images, like the ones of the crying civilian, have been shot up close, making you feel involved in what they show.'

The first part 'Some... civilian' sounds a bit strange to me. Is this sentence correct or do I need to replace 'like' by another word?

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While the usage of 'like' to mean 'such as' is not traditional, it is common and idiomatic, and is fine in anything but formal documentation. If you want to be formal, use 'such as', instead.

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I think what sounds odd is that "civilian" needs to be plural, or there needs to be some re-wording such as:

Some images, like the ones of crying civilians, ...
Some images, like the ones with a crying civilian, ...

It just comes down to, are you referring to "civilian photos", in general? Or, is there one, specific, civilian photo, or set of photos, that you are referring to.

For example, there is a famous photo taken in Vietnam in June, 1972 of young girl running naked, crying, from her village that had just been destroyed by a USAF napalm strike. In the context of that famous photo: "Some images, like the ones of the crying civilian, have been shot up close, making you feel involved in what they show." is perfect.

  • Thanks for your answer. I mean one man, probably in the Second World War, who is being helped by medics and crying. – Rowan Jan 5 at 9:00

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