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I wonder to use present or past in this case?

If I want to explain to someone and describe the problem.

1/ My car has a problem always that why I can't come on time to work.

2/ My car had a problem always that why I can't come on time to work.

  • Does the car have a problem now? Or is it fixed? Is this a "real" situation or are you using this as an example? Who are you talking to? Boss? Wife? Friend? Why are you telling this person this? – James K Jan 5 at 18:23
  • It is an example to learn and how and when to use present or past in conversation . not a real . The person is the Boss in the work and he asks me why are you late? – Sdg Jan 5 at 20:06
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If your car still has the problem, you would use the present tense with has.

If you car no longer has the problem, you would use the past tense with had.

But your examples could be written in better English:

Either:

My car has a persistent problem; that's why I can't come/get to work on time.

or

My car had a persistent problem; that's why I couldn't come/get to work on time.

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  • So if I come to work after fix the problem of the car I should use "had". – Sdg Jan 5 at 20:13
  • Thanks for the answer. – Sdg Jan 5 at 20:23
  • Can I use "always" with has and had. – Sdg Jan 5 at 20:33
  • Yes, but you would normally place it earlier in the sentence: **My car always has/had a problem...... – Ronald Sole Jan 5 at 22:31

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