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How can I say "When you finish something, please let me know"?

Let me know when you finish doing your work.

Is it grammatically correct?

closed as off-topic by starsplusplus, StoneyB, user3169, Ben Kovitz, Maulik V Dec 22 '14 at 8:48

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  • Your phrasing looks okay: "When you finish doing your work, please let me know." – snailcar May 26 '14 at 9:27
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    Do you have a specific reason you think your sentence might not be grammatically correct? Which part of the sentence are you unsure of? – starsplusplus Dec 21 '14 at 21:20
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Yes , you are correct there. It can also be written as:

Let me know when your task is completed

OR

Inform me when you accomplish your work/task.

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    Is it correct to say : Let me know when you have finished doing something ? – user74775 May 14 '14 at 14:07
  • Absolutely. I just stated possible alternatives. – Invoker May 14 '14 at 14:09
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There's a simple rule of thumb:

You use simple present to express future time after the conjunctions when, after, before, as soon as and until.

So, your sentence is grammatical.

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If your uncertainty is about to finish + gerund Longman DCE has registered this construction, whereas in dictionary.com it is not mentioned.

http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/finish_1

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/finish?s=ts

By the way, ... when you finish your work is shorter and simpler.

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Yes, it is correct.

You can say it as:

Let me know when you finish doing your work.

Or:

When you finish doing your work, let me know.

Invoker:

Let me know when your task is completed.

Bob The Zealot:

When your task is completed, let me know.

Invoker:

Inform me when you accomplish your work/task.

Bob The Zealot:

When you accomplish your work/task, inform me.

It can go both ways, and it still mean the same thing.

  • 17/8 You don't need that many examples. It makes the answer less dense. No one says: bob: 'HI' guy: 'HI BILL' bob 'HELLO' guy 'HELLO BILL.' It just looks weird. – Pyraminx Dec 22 '14 at 4:03

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