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ladder

a piece of equipment for climbing up and down a wall, the side of a building, etc., consisting of two lengths of wood or metal that are joined together by steps or rungs

Example: to climb up/fall off a ladder


stairs [plural] a set of steps built between two floors inside a building.

Example: 1. We had to carry the piano up three flights of stairs. 2. The children ran up/down the stairs. 3. at the bottom/top of the stairs. 4. He > remembered passing her on the stairs.


enter image description here

Look at this castle playhouse, children can climb up into the first floor of the playhouse via a panel with many small holes that children can put their feet in to climb.


What is it or are they called? a ladder or stairs?

  • Looks a slide to me, with foot holes. – Sandeep Kumar Jan 9 at 4:31
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    It looks like a ramp. – Vincent Y Jan 9 at 5:03
  • It's more like a kiddie version of a climbing wall I would say (quite common in playgrounds as an alternative to a ladder / stairs) – Smock Jan 9 at 11:28
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It is neither:

enter image description here

Ladders have rungs that are climbed and are straight, stairs have steps that are walked. This has neither. Colloquially it would be understood if you referred to it as either, or called it the entrance.

This however doesn't fit into those, the gaps are footholds and it fits closer to some kind of shallow climbing wall, a child would climb or clamber up this.

Here's a much clearer look https://dreamlandplayground.en.alibaba.com/product/1777572371-221608517/Dreamland_outdoor_indoor_children_plastic_playhouse_and_slide.html?spm=a2700.icbuShop.41413.11.293c5e9fDyiADq:

enter image description here

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I agree with @Sandeep Kumar; it’s neither ladder nor stairs. If I had to name it, I’d say it was a slide with foot holes.

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  • Slides are for downward movement. It doesn't look like something meant to be slid down, it'd be possibly a little dangerous with that curve. – LawrenceC Feb 8 at 16:35

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