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I am teaching my little child to speak English, but I am not a native speaker. So, Sometimes, when I face a situation, I may use structures or words that are weird. Native people wouldn't say like that when they were in the similar situation.

Ok, my child sometimes just wants to be naked, he doesn't want to wear any bottoms and I just want to give him some jokes.

what would I say in that situation? "You're so ashamed" or "Shame on you"?

I don't mean it literally.

shame on you, him, etc.

​(informal) used to say that somebody should feel ashamed for something they have said or done


ashamed (adj): feeling shame or embarrassment about somebody/something or because of something you have done

ashamed of something She was deeply ashamed of her behaviour at the party.

Mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of.

ashamed of somebody His daughter looked such a mess that he was ashamed of her.

ashamed of yourself You should be ashamed of yourself for telling such lies.

ashamed that… I feel almost ashamed that I've been so lucky.

ashamed to be something The football riots made me ashamed to be English.

You act as if you’re ashamed to be seen with me.

Note:

I know that in Western culture, everything is so clear-cut, "yes" means "yes", "no" means "no". But in Asia, sometimes, people blame someone just for the sake of joking, they don't mean it literally, nothing is so serious. If you live in Asia (China, Korea, Vietnam etc) long enough you will notice it. Do you have that kind of joking expression in this situation?

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As you found in the dictionary, "shame" is a feeling that a person can have. "Being ashamed" is having that feeling. "Shame on you" is a statement saying that the listener should have that feeling. It's short for "you should be ashamed of yourself" and this is what fits in your scenario.

This isn't related to English, but please ask yourself first if this is the feeling you want your child to experience instead of understanding and pride. The Parenting SE sister site is a great resource for further information or discussion.

  • I know that in Western culture, everything is so clear-cut, "yes" means "yes", "no" means "no". But in Asia, sometimes, people blame someone just for the sake of joking, nothing is so serious. Do you have that kind of joking expression in that situation? – Tom Jan 10 at 8:57

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