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When I've heard this song I've thought that there was "Love me too" .May be this is example of word playing? Maybe native speakers can hear this song the same way?

Love, love me do
You know I love you
I'll always be true
So please, love me do
Whoa, love me do
Love, love me do
You know I love you
I'll always be true
So please, love me do
Whoa, love me do
Someone to love
Somebody new
Someone to love
Someone like you
Love, love me do
You know I love you
I'll always be true
So please, love me do
Whoa, love me do
Love, love me do
You know I love you
I'll always be true
So please, love me do
Whoa, love me do
Yeah, love me do
Whoa, oh, love me do

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0pGOFX1D_jg

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    Misheard song lyrics are sometimes called mondegreens . When I first heard the Beatles' Paperback Writer I thought ir was 'paper bag writer'! But the 'd' sound here seems fairly clear to me. – Kate Bunting Jan 10 at 17:21
  • Thank you @Kate Bunting! Your information about mondegreens is new for me. When I heard "Love me do" song it was from cellphone with low quality of sound, and I really heard "too" instead. – sayfriend Jan 11 at 5:55
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I imagine the meaning is essentially:

Love me, do.

As in "do it", similar to:

"Shall I pour us a drink?"

"Yes, please do."

So, essentially, through the word "do", you're reiterating the request for someone to love you for emphasis.

This kind of "do this, do" phrasing, specifically, is not so common these days, but was more common at the time The Beatles would have written this song, at least in artistic-romantic expression. I've heard it in songs and films before, and find (particularly when spoken, i.e. in films) that it often gives the impression of a certain pining in the speaker.

It is not connected in any way to "love me too".

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Yup, it is wordplay."do" is used a lot around love so this song mixes the imperative (do love me), a question (do you love me) and marriage (I do)

But note that it is among their first songs so any meaning beyond "it sounds nice and we'd like to be famous" is pure conjecture.

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