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His beautiful, yet messy and long hair was a thing to see.

His beautiful, yet messy, and long hair was a thing to see.

I am not sure if it takes a comma, but I think there are arguments to be made for both sentences. I am not sure if one of them is grammatically incorrect.

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The word "yet" introduces a contrast. Everything before the next comma is included in that contrast. It doesn't make sense to contrast "beautiful" with "hair", so you need a comma before you get to "hair". If you put the comma right before "hair", you are contrasting "messy and long" with "beautiful", which is a bit weird. But if you put the comma after "messy", then "and long hair" is now all after the comma, which makes it look like one block. You'll need another comma before "hair" to make it clear that everything before that is all one modifier. This gets a bit clunky, so you might want to reword it as "His long and beautiful, yet messy, hair ..."

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I don't think you need a comma before an "and". But if you use a comma and an "and" word, it will lead to another independent clause. (My teacher said "," + "and" = ";") Find more here: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/30516/should-i-use-a-comma-before-and-or-or

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The inclusion or exclusion of the comma changes the meaning of the sentence:

His beautiful, yet messy and long hair was a thing to see.

means that you are qualifying / contrasting that his hair, whilst beautiful, is also 'messy and long'. However, I would include a comma after hair to make it sound more natural:

His beautiful, yet messy and long hair, was a thing to see.

Whereas:

His beautiful, yet messy, and long hair was a thing to see.

means that you are qualifying / contrasting that his hair, whilst beautiful, is also messy, and (separately) is also long. In this case, the length is not contrasting with the beauty of his hair, it is purely an additional description of his hair.

Hope that helps,

Alan.

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