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Am I right that:

I go there on 3pm

denotes I go there regularly on 3pm

I will go there on 3pm

denotes I have a plan to go there on 3pm

I will be going there on 3pm

denotes that the action will be going is carry on on 3pm

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    All are wrong; we use at with times, not on. Otherwise the verbs are OK, although your third 'denotes...' is poorly written - better, 'denotes that the action will be in progress at 3pm'. – Michael Harvey Jan 19 at 13:01
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(Following on Michael Harvey's comment)

As you surmise, I go there at 3 pm points to a regular arrangement and would generally (but not necessarily) be followed by an indication of the interval, such as: on Wednesdays, on weekdays, each day.

I will/shall go there at 3 pm points to the intention of the speaker. It leaves open the question of whether the speaker will leave for the destination or arrive there at 3 pm.

There is very little difference between the statement above and: I will be going there at 3 pm. Much of the time they are interchangeable and the choice will depend on preference and context.

However, there are circumstances where they may mean different things.

I fly to Boston at 3 pm

means that my flight to Boston leaves at 3 pm.

I will be flying to Boston at 3 pm

may mean that my flight to Boston departs at 3 pm or it may mean that I will be in the air en route at Boston at 3 pm.

So if someone asks you what you will be doing tomorrow afternoon at 3 pm, you may reply: I will be (somewhere over the Atlantic) flying to Boston.

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