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I need to find the man whose son you said (((he))) tried to find a job .

Should I use “he” after “you said” ? Or it can be understood that “ the one you talked about is son of the man ?

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  • It reads well without the "he" and your second sentence could be better as "The one you talked about is the son of that man." Jan 19, 2020 at 19:30
  • The relative clause is understood as "You said that the man's son tried to find a job", where the subject of the relative clause is ""whose son"; thus no further subject ("he") is possible.
    – BillJ
    Jan 20, 2020 at 13:27

2 Answers 2

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Your example is correct without 'he'. It is incorrect with 'he'.

In this case, 'son' is the subject of the clause so if you add another subject, 'he', it is redundant. We know the son is the son of the man because of the possessive, 'whose'.

His son tried to find a job.
He is the man whose son tried to find a job.
You said his son tried to find a job.
He is the man whose son you said tried to find a job.

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With the he, your sentence accepts a different interpretation:

I need to find the man (let's call him Smith) whose son you said he (Jones) tried to find a job [for].

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