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'To love is not demanding nor taking advantage needless to say, neither is it giving up nor sacrifice.'

Is this sentence correct?

Is there any room for improvement?

How about the following sentences?

'To love is not demanding or taking advantage needless to say, neither is it giving up or sacrifice.'

To love is not demanding nor taking advantage needless to say. Neither is it giving up nor sacrifice.'

  • Unfortunately, your complicated example sentences don’t make a lot of sense in a number of ways and so we can’t find a particular point of grammar to discuss. Try editing your question to clarify what you are asking us. Give us more context too please. – Orbital Aussie Jan 23 at 22:50
  • They should all be 'nor.' The trouble with it is, we can't tell if it means "not demanding; or taking advantage" or "not demanding advantage or taking advantage". And it's impossible to tell which bit is needless to say. Is all of it needless to say, or just 'taking advantage'? Also, 'To love' is in the infinitive, so all the verbs should be in the infinitive: 'To love is not to demand or (to) take advantage' etc. Or you could change 'To love' to 'Loving': then the rest of the verbs would be correct. – Old Brixtonian Jan 24 at 8:23

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