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  1. Mr. X worked in my laboratory under the Materials Science Division.
  2. Mr. X worked in my laboratory in the Materials Science Division.

Which sentence is correct? One of the professors of my wife wrote the following sentence.

It is a true pleasure for me to write this letter of recommendation for Ms. X who worked in my laboratory under the Materials Science Division during her Master’s thesis since 2015.

Is this sentence grammatically correct? If not, kindly suggest something.

2 Answers 2

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I can't think of any situation like this where I would use under. I checked with google NGrams: there are a significant number of "in the technology division" and no occurrences at all of "under the technology division". The same is true for computer, personnel, human resources and engineering and science.

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While both are technically fine, I would go with under. Under is typically used when talking about certain groupings or classifications. The Materials Science Division would count as a grouping of the laboratory. However, if you're going to talk about the division itself without mentioning the laboratory, then you can use in.

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    Re: "The Materials Science Division would count as a grouping of the laboratory": I believe that in the OP's case, it's the reverse: the laboratory is part of the Materials Science Division.
    – ruakh
    Jan 27, 2020 at 7:04
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    Welcome to ELL, Len. Generally we prefer answers that contain references that demonstrate the point that you are making, rather than simply expressing personal opinions. In this case, you could provide a link to the words in and under in a good dictionary, and quote relevant sections from the definitions. dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/under
    – JavaLatte
    Jan 27, 2020 at 7:15

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