2

Here's the context.

I admit that I'm not the best driver in the world and if I'm being totally honest, it's not at all unusual for me to drive above the speed limit. But, most of the time, I try to drive as responsibly as I can and, most importantly, I try my best not to get in the way of other drivers. Over the years, I've developed a lot of patience as well. Slow drivers don't bother me at all now. I can live with drivers cutting in front of me. I can even put up with drivers who blow cigarette smoke out their windows in heavy traffic. But there's one thing that I really have a hard time with / have difficulty with / have trouble with / struggle with and that's excessive use of car horns. From what I understand, car horns are meant to be used as a way of alerting other drivers and not as a way of punishing them.

Here, have a hard time with / have difficulty with / have trouble with / struggle with are the interchangeable? I think they are similar in the meaning, but I guess there's a subtle difference in nuance. Could you let me know that?

  • In this context, these can be used interchangeably. – gd1035 Jan 27 at 16:50
0

They are pretty much the same and all could be used. However,

"have difficulty with" and "have trouble with"

are both a bit awkward in this use.

Most would use

"struggle with" or "have a hard time with".

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