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What's the difference here? The word, of, is among the most difficult English word to learn, I guess...

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  • Does this answer your question? "This product is good value" vs "This product is of good value" in a sentence. Also “High quality” usage (specifically asking whether it's high quality, or of high quality, same as you're asking here). Jan 27, 2020 at 17:15
  • @FumbleFingersReinstateMonica There is a difference not explained by that other answer. And I just wrote it out: of high quality means: 10—used as a function word to indicate a characteristic or distinctive quality or possession a woman of courage. This is not a duplicate!
    – Lambie
    Jan 27, 2020 at 17:43
  • @Lambie: The question is obviously a duplicate (of at least one, if not both of the ones I linked to). If you think there's a meaningful difference not covered by answers to either of those, that's were you should be setting it out, not here. Personally, I think the difference is simply one of syntactic construction, not semantics - but you're perfectly entitled to hold a different opinion on that score. Just not on the matter of whether it's a duplicate, imho. Jan 27, 2020 at 17:54
  • @FumbleFingersReinstateMonica Those are different questions. of good value and of high quality. You were a little too fast on the trigger here. The difference is this: of x= a categoryof some kind. whereas x is just a noun. And that's a huge difference. There are now two reopen votes.
    – Lambie
    Jan 27, 2020 at 18:15
  • Like I said, a syntactic distinction, not a semantic one. Which is of no interest to me, but if you think it's important, add an answer to one of the earlier questions. There's no possible justification for having multiple questions that are all about exactly the same syntactic choice. Jan 27, 2020 at 18:26

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