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Here is a quote from an article where an expert says that the measures taken to stop the spread of the current coronovirus are not up to par. What I don't understand in it is the very last phrase:

The author also argued that official numbers are “grossly underestimating” the true toll of infections.

“They have a lag time in testing people; they don’t have enough test kits; they have lines around the block, in Wuhan, of people trying to get tested,” says Garrett. “It’s wholly backed up.”

What is wholly backed up? How is it backed up and by whom? And what kind of "backing up" exactly it is?

I know of two meanings of "back up". First one is "support" and the second one is "accumulate", but it looks like here is some other meaning.

  • @user105719. You are correct, of course! I’m not sure what made me leap in the wrong direction. I’ve deleted my comment. – Orbital Aussie Jan 29 at 11:26
  • @OrbitalAussie When I make those leaps, I just blame the drugs. – user105719 Jan 30 at 2:04
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The definition here is very close to "accumulate," but it's an intransitive verb:

back up

intransitive verb

: to accumulate in a congested state

//traffic backed up for miles

source: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/backup, Entry 2 of 2

"It" is referring to the process of testing people [for coronovirus].

"Wholly" means completely.

So "It's wholly backed up" is expressing that the testing process has slowed considerably, because of the factors in the middle of the quote:

"...they don’t have enough test kits; they have lines around the block, in Wuhan, of people trying to get tested...”

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