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a. He thinks he has every kind of disease. One day he thinks he has lung cancer. The next day he thinks he has stomach cancer. And then he thinks he thinks he has liver problems. It never ends.

b. He thinks he has all kinds of disease. One day he thinks he has lung cancer. The next day he thinks he has stomach cancer. And then he thinks he thinks he has liver problems. It never ends.

c. Every kind of disease there is, he thinks he has. One day he thinks he has lung cancer. The next day he thinks he has stomach cancer. And then he thinks he thinks he has liver problems. It never ends.

Which of the above are grammatically correct and are meaningful?

The issue for me is that he never thinks that he has all kinds of disease at the same time. There is no point in time where he says: 'I have all the diseases there are.' Every time it is a different disease. But he goes through them all in the long run. That is why I am not sure that the sentences work.

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All three of your versions are grammatical, including c, which places the object (disease) before the subject (he) to emphasize the ailment over the hypochondriac.

But grammar can take you only so far. All of your sentences leave open the possibility that the sufferer thinks he has multiple concurrent ailments. An easy word to make clear your intentions is the adverb of manner, seriatim, from the Latin, meaning one relevant subject after another in turn. Thus:

He thinks he has every kind of disease seriatim.

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    I'm not sure using a word that's barely used outside legal contexts and which most English speakers have never heard is the right choice here. 'In turn' would be more widely understood. – ssav Jan 29 '20 at 10:34
  • @ssav Quicquod. Don't be fooled by the (medieval) Latinate origin. Although the word is used in judicial writings, it's hardly restricted to that arena,and even there it's not a term of legal art. The Corpus of Contemporary American English lists 16 uses, only 5 of which are about the law, and those usages match the common meaning. The Ngram Viewer finds the word in books on entomology, theology, and poetry. – user105719 Jan 30 '20 at 2:01

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