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Hey, Would you beat your friend for 100 dollars?

What does this mean?

a) Requesting someone to beat his/her friend for 100 dollars?

or

b) Asking whether they would beat his friend for 100 dollars ?

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    Grammatically, I think it could technically mean either. Idiomatically, it would almost definitely mean the second. Jan 29 '20 at 16:43
  • Context is everything. So in a nightclub, Would you dance with me? would normally be a (slightly formal) way of requesting that you dance with the speaker right now. But those same words spoken on the telephone could either be understood as a "future request" (to be enacted at some future time, equivalent to Will you dance with me?), or a genuine question regarding some hypothetical situation (Would you dance with me if we were at a nightclub?). Jan 29 '20 at 17:28
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As stevekeiretsu says, the question could be hypothetical or it could be a request. The grammar is fine. The punctuation and use of capitals is awful! :-)

The question might be simpler if you used 'their' for the person addressed each time:

a) Requesting someone to beat their friend for 100 dollars.
or
b) Asking whether they would beat their friend for 100 dollars.

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