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What is the difference between fly in and fly to when talking about planes going somewhere? For example:

The plain has just flown in New-York.

The plain has just flown to New-York.

I have also heard people say fly out not fly from. What is the difference between these two. For example:

The plain flies out/from New-York at 11.

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"The plane has just flown in New York" implies a flight within the boundaries of New York. You could say that a new, experimental plane could take off, fly in a circle, and land in the same place, as having flown in a certain place.

"The plane has just flown to New York" implies a flight from somewhere to New York.

As to your last comment, "Fly out" would require a preposition after "out" - you could easily say "The plane flies out from New York [to Chicago]", or "The plane flies out to New York [from Chicago]" and mean different things.

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    Or, of course, 'flies into New York from Chicago. – Kate Bunting Jan 30 at 11:45
  • What about "the flight has just flown in Heatrow airport? Does that mean thay it has landed or just within the boundaries? – Dmytro O'Hope Jan 30 at 12:01
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    Nobody would say ""the flight has just flown in Heatrow airport". They would use into as Kate Bunting wrote 17 minutes earlier. – Michael Harvey Jan 30 at 12:22

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