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The tutorial is saying

once the studs are laid out we're going to put them in place, leave their hammer or nail gun.

I guess leave means using here. That guy indeed use nail gun a few seconds later.

So, what are the situations where "leave" mean "by using"?

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    I'm not convinced it says leave. I can't be certain, because he has a fairly strong accent with which I'm not familiar, and the audio quality isn't great at my end, but I think he says either "we'll need a hammer or nail gun" or "with either a hammer or nail gun". Jan 31, 2020 at 20:29
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    It's "...in place. With either a hammer or nail gun."
    – mkennedy
    Jan 31, 2020 at 20:42
  • @stevekeiretsu Thank you so much. Would you please move your comments to answer? I'll accept it.
    – zghqh
    Jan 31, 2020 at 20:45
  • @mkennedy is correct, the man says "with either a hammer or nail gun".
    – David42
    Jan 31, 2020 at 20:45

1 Answer 1

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There appears to be a small consensus that the man actually says "with either a hammer or nail gun", not "leave".

As to the question as originally asked, based on the wording originally (mis)heard, the short answer is that leave does not mean "by using".

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