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I try to get known what of few/a few/little/a little we can use as noun. I would be grateful if you leave examples.

2 Answers 2

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They can all be used as nouns. Consider the following examples:

Most people left before the storm hit. The few who remained did so because they had no means of transportation.

Most people left before the storm hit but there were a few who stayed behind because they had no means of transportation

There is lots of work get done but little time in which to do it.

There is lots of work to be done but only a little time in which to do it.

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  • Thank you so much!
    – ProstoCoder
    Commented Feb 1, 2020 at 7:44
  • Both your examples of "few" are determiners modifying the pronoun "who". Both your examples of "little" are adjectives modifying the noun "time".
    – CJ Dennis
    Commented Feb 2, 2020 at 3:09
  • They are not nouns, and nor are they modifiers. "Few", "a few", "little" and "a little" are all determinatives. In your examples "the/a few" is a fused determiner-head NP, but "a few" is still a determinative, not a noun. In "(a) little", again this is a fused determiner-head NP, where "(a) little" is a determinative, not a noun
    – BillJ
    Commented Feb 2, 2020 at 17:08
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"Few" is never a noun. It can be a pronoun (something that replaces a noun), or a determiner. From Wiktionary:

few

Determiner

few (comparative fewer or less, superlative fewest or least)

  1. (preceded by another determiner) An indefinite, but usually small, number of.

    I was expecting lots of people at the party, but very few (=almost none) turned up. Quite a few of them (=many of them) were pleasantly surprised. I don't know how many drinks I've had, but I've had a few. [This usage is likely ironic.]

  2. (used alone) Not many; a small (in comparison with another number stated or implied) but somewhat indefinite number of.

    There are few people who understand quantum theory.

Pronoun

few

  1. Few people, few things. Many are called, but few are chosen.

"Little" is similar. See little at Wikipedia. They do have a definition of "little" as a noun, but it makes no sense to me and I believe it is a mistake:

Can I try a little of that sauce? (makes sense)

* Can I try two littles of that sauce? (makes no sense)

As well as being a pronoun and a determiner, "little" can be an adjective and an adverb. Wiktionary and most other dictionaries have examples for most of their entries.

See also Oxford Learner's Dictionaries:

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