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I'm looking for an expression that would mean someone takes control over someone else, like in a bad relationship, when someone takes a dominant posture in spite of the other person. Google would translate this sentence :

You got your grip on me

As so in french. Though I know "get a grip" has a totally different meaning, so I suspect it isn't correct.

I also encountered this sentence :

You took hold of me

Please tell me if these google translations have meaning to you and if not, what would be the most appropriate expression to use.

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    As you say, metaphoric get a grip [on oneself] has a totally different meaning (keep or recover one's self-control). That doesn't imply She's got him in her grip can't be used metaphorically, but it wouldn't be common. Consider alternative metaphoric references, such as She's got him on a string (she's a "puppet-master"), or She's got him dancing to her tune (she's the controlling choreographer). Moving further afield, ...under her thumb (physically constrained, unable to act or move without her permission). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Feb 2 at 15:33
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Your sentence is very close to an idiomatic phrase:

To have (got) a [grip | hold] on [somebody | something].

You've got a grip on me.

You have a hold on me.

There is also a Beatles song called "You Really Got A Hold On Me"

Note that the first time the title is sung, it's:

You've really got a hold on me

Then the backing singers repeat it without ['ve] as in the title.

From Wiktionary:

Noun

hold (plural holds)

  1. Power over someone or something.
    • 2008, Christopher Clarke-Milton, Dawn of the Messiah - Book 1, →ISBN, page 199:
      The Judge accepts the payment, the law no longer has a hold on you, and therefore you are free to walk out of the court a free man or woman.
    • 2013, Wim Wenders & Mary Zournazi, Inventing Peace: A Dialogue on Perception, →ISBN, page 107:
      War has a hold on our cultural imaginations as an inevitable force, it is peace that has no benefactor.

"grip" is often a synonym of "hold".

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