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I've recently read a grammar rule; 'The present continuous can refer to the future', which suggests that English speakers often use the present continuous tense to talk about something that's about to happen.

So with that in my mind I could make these two sentences:

  1. The construction work will be completed in two months.

  2. The construction work is being completed in two months.

The latter sounds less natural to me. Nevertheless, I think it should be considered correct according to the rule above.

Is the sentence 2. actually in any way grammatically incorrect?

Thanks in advance.

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"Completion" can mean two things:

  1. The fixed point at which something is completed. This cannot be ongoing - something either is or is not complete.
  2. The final stage of something. This can be ongoing if you are currently in that final stage of completion.

Your first sentence is fine:

The construction work will be completed in two months.

This uses my first definition of "completed" - meaning the work will be finished in the future (in 2 months). This could be used to say that the work is currently ongoing.

Your second example is fine grammatically, but could not be used for ongoing work.

The construction work is being completed in two months.

You can only say "is being completed" about a future stage of completion. For example, if the work was partially completed, and the completion stage begins in two months.

You could say:

The construction work is being completed and will be finished in two months.

This would mean that the completion stage is currently underway, and that it will be totally complete in two months.

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