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A few students are going to the buses they'll be riding home. So a girl takes the long route to get to the bus. So one of the children wants to say "Why aren't you coming this way?"

Does this sound fine:

Why aren't you coming from here?

Does this sound fine? (I mean it was simply meant to ask "Why are you going that way, when you should be going this way?"; "Why aren't you coming this way?")

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    I don't understand what Why aren't you coming from here? is supposed to mean in this context, since presumably both speaker and addressee are "here" (unless they're talking on their mobile phones, which is a bit contrived). If they're still close together, but moving apart (because addressee is going by a different route), this way (the direction the speaker's going) makes more sense. Individual speakers may have preferences, but I don't think it makes any difference whether you use coming or going in such contexts. Commented Feb 3, 2020 at 15:32

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As FumbleFingers already implied,

Why aren't you coming from here?

simply isn't normal usage, in any context that I can think of.

You've already said "So one of the children wants to say "Why aren't you coming this way?" " which is perfectly normal and understandable, and probably the most common way of saying something like this. Both of your follow-up questions are also reasonably common, though longer-winded ways of saying the same thing.

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  • Mike, I corrected child to children in the question and followed suit in your answer. Commented Feb 3, 2020 at 23:02

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