0

I have a full sentence:
"I had the chance to read him in his reports, not all of his reports were perfect but his writing skill on a level far from I expected"
Is this same with
"I had the chance to read his reports, not all of his reports were perfect but his writing skill on a level far from I expected"
I mean I know "read him" like understand about sb but I don't know the two sentences have the same meaning.

  • 1
    You are right that to read somebody means to understand them, as in I can't read him. But if you read somebody their report (as in sentence 1), then it simply means you read the report aloud so that they can hear it. So, did you read the reports aloud to him or not? – Shoe Jan 21 at 10:51
  • I just edit the question, what about "read him in his report", @Shoe? – sekiro Jan 21 at 10:58
  • No, you should omit the in. Please note also that you should use a full-stop or semi-colon not a comma to separate the sentences; and that you need a verb in the clause starting but his writing skill. – Shoe Jan 21 at 11:18
  • and what about "read him in his reports" nearly same with "read his report" or same with "understand about him through his report" – sekiro Jan 21 at 11:37
  • 1
    Unfortunately, both of these sentences contain numerous grammatical errors, beyond just the difference you're asking about. "I had the chance to read his reports. Not all of his reports were perfect, but his writing skill is on a level far from what I expected." – Spencer Jan 21 at 11:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy