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It sounds like the video is saying (link with a time stamp corresponds the following)

All right, so this is interesting, and it's a valid question, but what it comes down to is every kid has a different learning style.

"every kid has a different learning style" is a statement/fact, which plays a role of object of "comes down to" as whole.

In this case, is "that" required or optional to form this sentence in written English?

what it comes down to is that every kid has a different learning style

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  • This is actually similar to this question. People throw whole clauses in without connecting phrases anymore. May 24, 2023 at 3:44

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"What it comes down to" is an idiomatic expression used to highlight a main, or underlying point. It essentially means the same as "basically".

It's a valid question, but basically, every kid has a different learning style.

I expect it shares a root meaning with the expression "boil down to". When you literally boil something, it reduces down to its component parts. Used as a metaphor, it is used to show that you have deconstructed something complex to show the most basic, underlying reason or main point.

What it boils down to is that every kid has a different learning style.

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  • In the original citation, there is a "is" in there, so, the whole statement "every kid has a different learning style" is the object of "is", right?
    – peterpanai
    Feb 10, 2020 at 14:36
  • @peterpanai Yes.
    – Astralbee
    Feb 10, 2020 at 14:53
  • In that situation, is "that" unnecessary, required or optional?
    – peterpanai
    Feb 10, 2020 at 22:08

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