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I have googled and rarely found the example of usage. Instead I found "for the purpose of" is more common. My English teacher, who is not English-native speaker, showed me one but I rather disagree with her. For example: The spy dyed his hair (,since/,so/;hence,/for the purpose that) he wouldn't be recognized. Her answer is "for the purpose that". I thought "so" or "hence" is more suitable.

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    "Grammatically correct" isn't a useful concept here. The cited "answer" is completely non-idiomatic. Note that the word that is entirely optional after so in such contexts. Also note that so [that] is the only credible answer among those possibilities you've set out (one valid alternative is in order that, but this wouldn't be common). Finally, hence has a slightly different meaning, which doesn't suit your context. Commented Feb 10, 2020 at 15:42
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    All are pretty bad: The spy died his hare so he wouldn't be recognized. There is no need for heavy circumlocutions. You are right, "so" is best. "hence" means therefore.
    – Lambie
    Commented Aug 2, 2021 at 17:19

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For example: The spy dyed his hair (,since/,so/;hence,/for the purpose that) he wouldn't be recognized. [buzzer]

Corrected:

For example: The spy dyed his hair so he wouldn't be recognized. OR For example: The spy dyed his hair for the purpose of not being recognized.

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  • Also, "in order not to be recognized", "so as not to be recognized", "with the intent of avoiding recognition"... none of which is as good as "so" :) Commented Sep 26, 2022 at 14:05
  • @LukeSawczak The more the merrier. :)
    – Lambie
    Commented Sep 26, 2022 at 14:16
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So, hence, and for the purpose that are all correct. It depends on your context and where you are speaking.

The "purpose of" something is the reason that it exists, its intended function. This is an abstraction, typically.

The "purpose for" something is an actual use. This is a concrete example.

The "purpose that" something is used when there are multiple purposes and this is calling out one in particular.

Examples:

The spy dyed his hair for the purpose of blending in to his surroundings.

The purpose for the spy dying his hair was to blend in to his surroundings.

The spy dyed his hair for the purpose that he was meant to deceive the enemy.

These can interchange a bit with subtle meaning shifts.

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