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Tell me please which one of the following sentences sounds the most natural.

I won't be in time if I take the bus, so I will call a taxi.

I won't be in time if I take the bus, so I will call the taxi.

I won't be in time if I take the bus, so I will call in a taxi.

I won't be in time if I take the bus, so I will call in the taxi.

What I am trying to say is that I will call a taxi so that it can pick me up and take somewhere. I don't mean a specif taxi just a taxi.

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    The first one is correct. The second would be correct if you are in a remote place that has only one taxi. The "call" here means "hail" or "telephone" a taxi. – Weather Vane Feb 11 '20 at 20:31
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Call for a taxi

According to this site:

https://englishlive.ef.com/blog/english-in-the-real-world/useful-phrases-take-taxi-english/

Although this question was previously asked:
Are "call a taxi (a cab)" and "call for a taxi (a cab)" the same?

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  • I wonder what “real world” that website refers to? In my Australian idiolect “call a taxi” is far more common than “call for a taxi”. Notice also that the answer accepted for the previous question was from a British English speaker. @lee is your answer in relation to American English (your profile doesn’t help)? If not, we should perhaps wait for an American English response. – Orbital Aussie Feb 12 '20 at 12:49

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