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Are the words update and changed verbs, adjectives, or both?

In this sentence, is updated used as a verb or an adjective?

This is to inform you that the relieving date of PRAVIN PATKAR(Emplid:12920)is changed to 09-05-2014 and the same is "updated" in HRMS.

I ask this because so far as I know change and update are verbs. Can we use these words with "is", or should we use "has been" in the sentence?

This is to inform you that the relieving date of PRAVIN PATKAR(Emplid:12920) has been changed to 09-05-2014 and the same has been updated in HRMS.

  • Duplicate – Sandeep D May 19 '14 at 11:59
  • it is not duplicate. i wanted to ask that as per my knowleage "change" and "update" are verbs. Then can we use it (change and update) with "is" or should we use "has been" in above sentence. – user4084 May 19 '14 at 12:46
  • Yes you can. Past participles of verbs(changed and updated) have adjectival force. But I don't think this is the issue here. In both of the sentences, changed and updated are used as past participles and not verbs. Verbs are "is" and "has been" respectively. Name is updated- simple present, Name has been updated-present perfect. – Sandeep D May 19 '14 at 13:05
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I see many questions in a single question!

Let's start with the heading.

What determines whether a word is used as a verb or an adjective? ~ Broadly, verb is an action word. Adjective is a word that expresses an attribute of something. Good read here.

The second question:

Are the words 'update' and 'changed' verbs, adjectives, or both? ~ The word update is verb and noun and not adjective. The adjective is updatable. Yes, changed is adjective and verb both.

The third question:

In this sentence, is updated used as a verb or an adjective? ~ Certainly verb. Check Answer#2.

The fourth question:

Can we use these words with "is", or should we use "has been" in the sentence? ~ As Sandeep Dhamija comments, changed and updated are past participles. It'll change from the simple present to present perfect.

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The difference between verbs, nouns, and adjectives (functions) in English is often not easy to determine because the forms do not often change when the functions of the word changes. In some cases, they do change forms, but not always.

In your examples, "update" is an interesting example. The writer might well have said "has been updated," which means it is a verb. The verb phrase "is updated" could be a verb plus an adjective, but there is an -ed at the end, which tells us that it's a verbal form as perfect participle. We often use perfect participles as adjectives, such as to say, "Windows 3.0 is outdated." But, this could also easily be a passive voice form.

In the example "This is updated in the HRMS," it isn't exactly clear how the forms are being used. You are right to feel confused. My inclination is to say that it is an adjectival use of the verb rather than a passive voice use. The reason I say this is the use of the present tense. If the form were meant to communicate passivity, I pretty sure the writer would have written "It has been updated." To say it is updated" means it has that quality of "updatedness," the same that Windows 3.0 has the quality of "outdatedness." There also is the very real possibility that the bureaucrat who wrote this was writing it at 4:00 PM and that last cup of coffee was losing it's effect and she was doing all she could to keep from collapsing. In this dogged state, she made a typo.

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