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right side up ​(North American English) with the top part turned to the top; in the correct, normal position

I dropped my toast, but luckily it fell right side up.


upside down: ​in or into a position in which the top of something is where the bottom is normally found and the bottom is where the top is normally found

The canoe floated upside down on the lake.


sideways: with one side facing forwards

She sat sideways on the chair.

The sofa will only go through the door sideways.


They are all adverbs, but sometimes it is hard to imagine how they are used.

It is easy to use these adverbs for some even objects such as a bottle.

The bottle is held "right side up" enter image description here


The bottle is held "upside down" enter image description here


The bottle is held "sideways" enter image description here


However, how to use these adverbs for some uneven objects such as a baby cart.

This is the correct position of a baby cart (Note: I am not sure what to call it, but it is a cart that helps toddlers to learn to walk). The wheels on the floor and the handle stand upright.

enter image description here


What if the cart lies on its handle on the floor like this

enter image description here

Could we loosely say "the cart is upside down" or "it is sideways"?


What if the side of the cart lies on the floor like this

enter image description here

Could we loosely say "the cart is sideways"?

Or, it looks like this

enter image description here

Could we loosely say "the cart is upside down"?

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Yes, picture 4 is upside down. I would call picture 3 lying on its side. I would use sideways if the cart was moving in the direction of one of its sides, maybe because someone was kicking it out of the way. As to picture 2, you would have to say something like it is tipped up on its handle.

  • I would say that in picture 1 the cart is on its back. – Michael Harvey Feb 13 '20 at 12:36

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