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Are the following sentences wrong? When I read them, I can't sense any wrong and all the same. Would you mind explaining their reasons if a wrong exists?

  • The official was on leave yesterday owing to your being absent.
  • The official was on leave yesterday owing to you being absent.
  • The official was on leave yesterday owing to your absence.

To be clear, how are they grammatically right? For example, your best friend is a worker in a restaurant in which you are an employee as well. Since I know you will be on leave tomorrow he doesn't want to come to work on that day too and he will be on leave too. Assume the sentences are said by 3rd guy.

  • No, they're not wrong. All three of them are perfectly good English. – Old Brixtonian Feb 13 at 5:25
  • @OldBrixtonian how are they grammatically right? Would you mind clarifying? – snr Feb 13 at 5:35
  • I'm afraid I can't say how they are right. In mathematics there are proofs, but in language . . . – Old Brixtonian Feb 13 at 7:00
  • In my idiolect this form of words is possible but very unlikely. “Owing to” in this context is, for me, very outdated and awkward. I’d expect to hear, “...was on leave yesterday because you were absent.” – Orbital Aussie Feb 14 at 1:43

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