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The speaker is lecturing (https://youtu.be/vzsQkjX4fD8)

whether you are an English Learner an actor or someone generally interested in linguistics learning the IPA the international phonetic alphabet is going to greatly benefit you.

It sounds like that there is a "v" in "generally", What I saw at her mouth matches what I heard.

The image shown below is a screenshot at the time stamp just before she pronounce "v", about 0:04.03. Note: 03 is my estimate, since youtube does not show milliseconds (may youtube supports but I don't know)

enter image description here

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  • Where (at what point in the word) did you hear the V? I just heard very clear, slightly robotic, pronunciation of her words for the benefit of her audience. Feb 17, 2020 at 5:14
  • @OrbitalAussie The image I posted is a screenshot at the time stamp just before she pronounce "v", about 0:04.03. Note: 03 is my estimate, since youtube does not show milliseconds (may youtube supports but I don't know)
    – brennn
    Feb 17, 2020 at 5:31
  • I seriously doubt you can “see” this pronunciation. In any case, the image of her lips is hardly important if we don’t hear the sound. I think we are off topic. Feb 17, 2020 at 6:06
  • @OrbitalAussie Did you actually listen the time stamp where I pointed out?
    – brennn
    Feb 17, 2020 at 6:17
  • Listening over again I do get a hint of what I think of as a “British lisp” which in this case is “generally” pronounced a bit like “genwerllay”. I think this is a feature of a “posh” British accent but I’m no expert by any means and we need a British English speaker to get involved. (I still can’t “see” the lisp and I was trying to hear a V when it turned out to be a soft W! Anyway, I’m glad we got somewhere in the end.) Feb 17, 2020 at 6:43

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The sounds she is making in the word "generally" are, as I interpret them, /'dʒɛnrwəli:/. The sound you are asking about you I have notated as /rw/, by which I mean a single sound that seems like a blend of /r/ and /w/.

To quote Wikipedia > "Cockney" in the (rather long) "Typical features" section: "Cockney has been occasionally described as replacing /ɹ/ with /w/. For example, thwee (or fwee) instead of three, fwasty instead of frosty. Peter Wright, a Survey of English Dialects fieldworker, concluded that this was not a universal feature of Cockneys but that it was more common to hear this in the London area than elsewhere in Britain.[83] This description may also be a result of mishearing the labiodental R as /w/, when it is still a distinct phoneme in Cockney."

Although most of my schoolfriends had more or less Cockney accents, I cannot quite describe this /rw/ sound or even reproduce it myself. Perhaps it is simply a /w/ on the lips and a simultaneous /r/ on the tongue.

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