4

I want to go to swim.

I want to go swimming.

I want to go to swimming.

I wonder which one is correct and how to tell the difference between them.

3
  • All three mean the same thing. [1]: english.stackexchange.com/questions/55431/…
    – Gibbs
    May 20 '14 at 9:50
  • I don't think any of them will be preferred. I want to go for a swim where swim is a noun. If you want to use verb, then I want to go for swimming looks better to me.
    – Maulik V
    May 20 '14 at 9:57
  • 6
    @Maulik: Nah. "I want to go for swimming" is an extremely unlikely construction that in most contexts I would simply dismiss as "ungrammatical", whereas OP's second example (without for) is perfectly natural phrasing. May 20 '14 at 17:12
7

I want to go to swim.

Phrasing it this way implies that your primary goal is to swim. For instance, it would be the proper response to the question "Why do you want to go to the lake?"

I want to go swimming.

Phrasing it this way implies a desire to perform the act of swimming. It is more of a general intention to go swimming anywhere. It is equivalent to saying "I want to go for a swim."

I want to go to swimming.

Phrasing it this way does not make sense.

-1

First one is correct. I want to go to swim. Here to swim is infinitive form of verb . so infinitive form always takes to+ first form of verb While go to swimming is wrong. Go for swimming iscorrect. Swimming is acting as a gerund

1
  • Welcome to ELL.SE. While I want to go to swim is grammatically correct, the bare infinitive forms I want to go swim or I want to go swimming are more idiomatic. There are situations in which each of the pains is preferable.
    – choster
    Dec 17 '20 at 21:16

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