1

I guess these 3 sentences are all idiomatic.

  1. He always wakes up early
  2. He usually wakes up early
  3. He wakes up early usually

However, I am not so sure if these 2 sentences are idiomatic

  1. he wakes up early always
  2. he wakes up always early

In addition, These 3 sentences confuses me much more.

  1. "She slowly began to recover." as you can see, the adverb "slowly" usually comes next to before the main verb "began"
  2. "She slowly began to recover." as you can see, the adverb "slowly" comes usually next to before the main verb "began"
  3. "She slowly began to recover." as you can see, the adverb "slowly" comes next to usually before the main verb "began"

The most important thing is, I just don't know the grammar standard for this kind of cases. Could someone give a link or some keywords?

This post gives this order (also known as "Royal Order of Adverbs")

  1. Manner
  2. Place
  3. Frequency
  4. Time
  5. Purpose

This video gives a different one

enter image description here

Which one should I choose?

I guess the order in that video is incorrect as comments below the video pointed out, though I did find a solid reference for the Royal Order of Adverbs.

  • "She slowly began to recover." as you can see, the adverb "slowly" usually comes next to before the main verb "began." Where are these examples from - did you make them? – Jan Feb 21 at 12:03
  • @Jan a video about Position of Adverbs – WXJ96163 Feb 21 at 14:41
  • The 1) is OK: She slowly began to recover." as you can see, the adverb "slowly" usually comes before the main verb "began." (so "usually comes" = usually before a verb). You don't say "next to before" though. The 2) and 3) are not OK. – Jan Feb 21 at 14:48
1

It is unusual and odd to use the adverbs "usually" or "always" at the end of the sentence.

Cambridge Dictionary:

The adverb usually refers to what typically or normally happens. We use it mostly in mid position, between the subject and the main verb, or after the modal verb or first auxiliary verb, or after be as a main verb:

  • Children usually enjoy visits to the zoo.
  • I usually get up around eight o’clock.
  • You can usually buy tickets for rock concerts on the Internet.
  • Are you usually in your office on Thursdays?

The same rule applies for "always."

Note, that even if "usually and "always" are adverbs, the rules about their position are not necessary the same as for other adverbs (early, slowly...).

Additionally, it sounds odd to use "usually" or "always" in a row with another adverb ending with -ly, like: "He wakes up early usually." It's better to say: "He usually wakes up early."

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