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I need the wheat flour of which I bought 20 kg. two days ago.

I need the wheat flour 20 kg. of which I bought two days ago.

Where should I use '' 20 kg.'' in the sentences above or would these sentences mean the same? I thought both have the same meaning but I couldn't be sure.

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    They're equivalent in meaning, but your first version is more "natural" (it doesn't require any special enunciation or punctuation, which the second version does). Note that simplest of all (and certainly preferred by me) would be I need the wheat flour that I bought 20 kg. of two days ago. – FumbleFingers Feb 21 '20 at 15:46
  • You don't need a full stop after abbreviations of measures (kg, mm...).o – Jan Feb 21 '20 at 17:46
  • @FumbleFingersReinstateMonica 20 kg of two days ago? – user105719 Feb 22 '20 at 3:59
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    @user105719: Yes. But note that the words 20 kg of two days ago do not constitute a "self-contained syntactic unit". It's just that's where we normally put the preposition. The alternative format is your second version I need the wheat flour of which I bought 20 kg two days ago (also valid, but my guess is idiomatically my version would be far more common in natural spoken contexts). – FumbleFingers Feb 22 '20 at 16:43
  • @FumbleFingersReinstateMonica why do you prefer "that" instead of "which" in the first comment? just asking out of curiosity – Fermichem Mar 15 '20 at 20:43
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They're both valid and mean the same thing, but I think you need a comma in at least one, and it would do no harm in both. As @FumbleFingers pointed out, neither is very natural in spoken English and arguably over-formal in written.

Most importantly, you are making a common English learners mistake of trying to work around 'of which' in a graceful way but ending up with something that sounds clunky. You are avoiding ending a clause with 'of' probably because you have been taught that to do so is 'wrong'. It really isn't. In fact, you can dispense with 'of which' entirely and form a shorter sentence which flows much better.

I need the wheat flour I bought 20 kg of two days ago.

I need the 20kg of wheat flour I bought two days ago.

'Which' and 'that' are both words that can often be omitted without any loss in meaning. When they can be, they usually should.

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I'm going to disagree with the other answer and say that your usage is slightly off.

Here's why: you don't need the "the" before "wheat flour"

Either you need some wheat flour, and you happened to buy 20kg a few days ago, in which case you could say either:

I need wheat flour, of which I bought 20 kg. two days ago.

or

I need wheat flour, 20 kg. of which I bought two days ago.

The other situation is you need the exact amount you bought the other day (with most people inferring that you bought it for this specific purpose). In that case, you could say either:

I need the wheat flour which I bought 20 kg. of two days ago.

or

I need the 20 kg of wheat flour which I bought two days ago.

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  • Completely unnatural sounding....sorry. – Lambie May 25 '20 at 21:36

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